Your Cat's Diet: Minerals

25_MPC_75824_PetCenter_YourCatsDietMinerals

The health of a cat depends on the content of minerals in her diet. A diet poor in minerals can lead to considerable deficiency symptoms if fed over a longer period of time. There is an increased risk of health problems if the diet is not balanced. Animal products such as muscle fibers, kidney and liver contain too little of some minerals and too much of others. If you feed your cat only commercially prepared cat food you don't have to worry about not giving her enough minerals in her diet.

Among the most important minerals are:

  1. Sodium — Sodium is a component of common table salt and exists sufficiently in the diet. Thus, you don't have to worry about sodium deficiency.
  2. Calcium — Calcium is important for the development of bones and teeth, but is also necessary for blood coagulation and the transport of nerve impulses.
  3. Phosphorus — Phosphorus contributes to nearly all the processes in metabolism. To cover the need for calcium and phosphorus, not only the amount is important, but also the quantities of these minerals in relation to each other. Meat contains far less calcium than phosphorus, and an all-meat diet thus leads to diseases of the skeleton and teeth.
  4. Magnesium — Your cat needs magnesium to keep nerves and muscles healthy.

Besides these minerals that the body needs as building blocks, there are others that are necessary in small amounts as trace elements: zinc and iodine for fur formation; copper and iron for sufficient blood formation.

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